East Lancashire Railway Armistice Exhibition

We could never have imagined, when we began our WW1 project four years’ ago, just how far and deep the sentiment (Bury remembering the First World War) would spread into our community. The extracted newspaper images, obituaries and articles have inspired painters, poets, historians and genealogists to keep on remembering those local lads who lost their lives a century ago.

Luggage Tags with Soldiers’ face images from local newspaper archive; text taken from Bury Station’s Roll of Honour

Armistice Exhibition 2018 on the over-bridge at Bury Station

The Armistice is nearly upon us and this has brought with it fresh opportunities for our community to get involved and to pay their respects to all those who fell. We did just that with a visit to the East Lancashire Railway Armistice Exhibition which decorates the over-bridge at Bury Station.

Using images, obituaries and articles taken from our newspaper archive and displaying them in such a unique way makes for a very thought-provoking tribute. We instantly connected with it because it feels very recognisable; the suitcases, luggage tags and hundreds of faces gathered together helps us to imagine the daily situation on that train station during 1914 – 1918. There would have been cheers and shouts, tears and goodbyes; silent prayers and the terrifying fear that loved ones would never see each other again – reality hits hard when we see the hundreds of military men decorating the station walkway. The ELR have shown us what an Archive does best! and that is to connect us directly to the past.

Above and below are just some of the pictures we took at the station; the red brick walls, dark red floors and knitted poppies complement what is a very striking exhibition:

Thanks to all at the ELR who have put so much thought in helping Bury to remember The First World War.

The Armistice Exhibition will be on display at Bury Station until the 11th November 2018.

Wendy

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Bury Remembers the First World War and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s